Camille Djokoto

Camille is a Toronto-based Registered Psychotherapist and Somatic Movement Specialist providing trauma-informed, socially-conscious therapy. Her practice is informed by anti-oppressive, anti-racist, queer, and feminist values. Camille’s approach is relational, experiential, and embodied, inspired by somatic training, and 30+ years of dance and movement experience. Her practice integrates various body-centered modalities including Laban and Bartenieff movement analysis, Sensorimotor Psychotherapy, Developmental Somatic Psychotherapy, Body-Mind Centering, Gestalt, as well as Anti-Oppression, Grief, and Crisis intervention training.

Camille uses an embodied approach to recognize and process signs of stress and trauma, assisting clients to develop the skills necessary to tune in and listen deeply to the answers the body holds. Through somatic explorations Camille helps clients gain insight into behavioural patterns, drawing awareness to how we embody relationships with various environments, institutions, and oppressive systems.

Camille is experienced supporting clients dealing with racial oppression, anxiety, depression, trauma, abuse, grief, suicidal ideation, self-harm, addictions, life transitions, chronic illness with a focus on breast cancer including physical and neurocognitive disabilities, as well as issues related to gender identity, sexuality, and cultural identity.

Camille is a member in good standing with the College of Registered Psychotherapists of Ontario (CRPO), the Canadian Association for Psychodynamic Therapy (CAPT) and the Canadian Alliance of Dance Artists – Ontario Chapter (CADA-ON).

AYA

The Aya is a west African Adinkra symbol meaning “Fern”.

This symbol represents perseverance, endurance, and resourcefulness. It symbolizes defiance against oppression. It is derived from an expression that when translated means “I am not afraid of you.  I am independent of you”. The fern is known for its capacity to grow in unusual places, withstanding tough climates and challenging environments.

Like the Aya, the human spirit holds the capacity to overcome adversity, to grow and even thrive despite the many challenging conditions it encounters. With support and collective healing we can learn to embody our resilience and harness our inner strength.